Tuesday, May 11, 2021

No Power in the ‘Verse Can Stop this Leo, Part 1

Tara was the most cunning huntress in her pride. Sharp clawed, strong backed, and charged with the kind of agility that always got her jaws around a throat before her prey could gurgle a bloody yelp. But today, Tara was just scouting.

She crouched low, almost flat against the formerly rich soil that had been turned into wasteland by the two-legged in stolen skins. In the past, her pride had laws forbidding the hunting of the two-legged beasts. But food had gone scarce, and mothers had to do unspeakable things to keep cubs from starvation.

The musky scent of fear and old wool reached Tara’s nose before the bleating hit her ears. She sighed in relief. She wouldn’t have to return home with the location of two-legged young. She had grown not to mind bloodying her muzzle in meat that had threatened her pride with sticks that spat burning stones. But their young were a different matter. Feeding on them felt wrong. Young flesh did fill the belly, but it tainted the spirit with the taste of sorrow and regret.

Tara focused on the sheep that had limped some distance from the rest, she tensed her hind legs, and pounced. But before she could reach her prey, her back and the top of her head were smacked down by a heavy web that pushed her face and belly into the thirsty dirt.

She roared, trying to rip the snare with her claws and teeth. But the thing just tangled tighter, crushing her ribs, stealing her breath. She struggled for some time, until she was finally able to stand under the net. Then a burning stone stung the side of her neck. Tara’s legs wobbled. Her eyes began to close. She tasted dust and her own blood before her whole world went dark. 

Part 2
Part 3

 


photo by Jean Wimmerlin, on Unsplash

- the title echoes a favorite quote from Firefly: “No power in the ‘verse can stop me!”
- for Poets and Storytellers United--Weekly Scribblings #69: Of the Hunt
and Writers’ Pantry #70: Words for Healing.

53 comments:

  1. This is sad, Magaly. Poor creature, more and more of them are being killed, mostly for their pelts/furs. I hope this one isn't the one we have had running loose, but now someone has it, hiding it.
    ..

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  2. It is the way of Nature – which even includes us. We all have a right to eat (and carnivores have little choice but to kill to eat) and we all have the right to protect ourselves against predators. But I can't help worrying about her cubs.

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    1. I believe the same. Nature can be rather ruthless when it comes to survival. It's when survival is not involved that I get infuriated.

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    2. I mean, when the hunting has little to do with food.

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  3. The struggle for "compassion" in this universe is never ending XXX

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  4. Funny how we almost never put ourselves inside the heads of those we stalk, herd, or pen up for food. You do that beautifully here Magaly, and add to the magnificence by creating a concept that carnivores have reservations about devouring their prey's youngsters. And I especially love how you get us thinking like her by describing the bullets as burning stones. Awesome write!

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    1. Thank you, Ron.. And I agree, if we could put ourselves in the heads of other living things, the world wouldn't be what is is.

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  5. Oh the paradox, the paradox.
    A gripping tale Magaly

    Happy Wednesday

    Much💚love

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  6. Oh dear, this was riveting and sorrowful. You did an admirable job of putting yourself in the mind of the hunter here!

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  7. 'the taste of sorrow and regret' ... too late. too late. Chilling prose, Magaly.

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  8. I liked this from the perspective of the hunter who has herself been hunted. Really good read.

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  9. Intriguing that a wild animal could feel a pause at killing a young human child - I'd like to think that is true. Hunted being hunted - it is the way of life and survival. Powerful writing.

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  10. What a great concept. This is very well written, and I like the gritty endind.

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  11. I'm enthralled. Looking forward to the next instalment!

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  12. The title intrigued me, Magaly, being a Leo myself, and I enjoyed the picture you painted of Tara in the opening paragraphs – a formidable lion and mother. I love the way the simple phrase ‘musky scent of fear and old wool’ evokes the image of sheep. I was surprised by the twist in the tale, the ‘heavy web that pushed her face and belly into the thirsty dirt’, and hope that she can free herself.

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  13. I feel a bit sad for Tara's cubs. But this is a brilliant and multifaceted to the prompt.

    And oh, an interesting conversation you overhead at your doctor's. The one who proudly stated, "I’m always the one doing the hunting.”
    reminds me of a Bantu proverb, which says the hunter who always comes home with meat is a thief...

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  14. What with trophy hunters or wild animal fearful humans we really are terrible race to be on a planet with so much wildlife. We kill other creatures to eat or eliminate them just for disgusting pride. Sadly humans with a conscience are too few.

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  15. gripping scary and almost terrifying -a great narrative

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  16. I will wait until Tuesday and be back.

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  17. i loved the story told from the perspective of the lioness. Brilliant.
    i am sure Tara will be back in the next instalment.

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  18. I'm completely caught up too and worried about her cubs now! Really fined and earthy writing here.

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  19. It seams wrong to kill a creature of conscience when the two legged ones lack conscience.

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  20. Oh, this hits me hard. Nature is what it is, and we humans so often complicate it. I too worry about her cubs.

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    1. We are really good at complicating things, if it means getting what we want--regardless of how much doing so might hurt other creatures.

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  21. Poor Tara. Wish she didn't have to go like that. When will the two-legged beasts stop preying on the four-legged ones.

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  22. Happy Sunday Magaly
    Thank you for dropping by my blog today

    Much💚love

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  23. A wild woman in whichever form has got to do what it takes to protect the tribe and pride.

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  24. So sad. Each species of adult has a fierce need to protect their young. Love this, Magaly.

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  25. I am so sorry Tara!!!!
    Big Hugs!

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I love your insightful remarks. So, go ahead, let them fly…